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// Films // Our Land, My People: The Struggle of the Lubicon Cree

Our Land, My People: The Struggle of the Lubicon Cree

Multiple Directors / United Kingdom / 2008 / 30 ' / English

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Offiicial Premiere: Stanley Milner Library Theatre 7 Sir Winston Churchill Square Edmonton, Alberta

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One of Canada's and Alberta's most notorious human rights failings on the world stage.

Synopsis

The documentary "Our Land, My People: The Struggle of the Lubicon Cree" follows Lubicon councillors, elders, and band members as they share with Amnesty International the impact of resource exploitation on their way of life and traditional economy. Over $14B has been extracted from Lubicon land; the Lubicon have seen not a penny. Since the late 1970s, the Lubicon Cree, an Indigenous people in Alberta, Canada, have seen the land on which they depend transformed by logging and large-scale oil and gas extraction. Despite a 1990 decision by the United Nations Human Rights Committee that the human rights of the Lubicon Cree are being violated by the impact of natural resource extraction, the Canadian authorities have failed to bring about a fair resolution of the long standing land dispute. "The many long decades of failure to respect the human rights of the Lubicon Lake Indian Nation in Northern Alberta have become one of Canada's and Alberta's most notorious human rights failings on the world stage," said Alex Neve, secretary-general of Amnesty International Canada. Amnesty International has launched a global initiative in support of the Lubicon Cree. Link to Amnesty International Campaign: www.amnesty.ca/amnestynews/upload/AMR200062008.pdf This short film (30 minutes) follows Lubicon councillors, elders, and band members as they share with Amnesty International the impact of resource exploitation on their environment, way of life, and traditional economy. Shot on location in northern Alberta by an accomplished British film company with long ties to Amnesty International, this film stands as a powerful indictment of a nation and province that have violated international law in their shameful treatment of the Lubicon Cree. Yet the film also stands as a testament to the Lubicons’ enduring resistance, their ability to preserve their culture and values in the face of incredible odds.

 

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