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network 05/05/2015 - 03:00PM

YOU DON’T LIKE THE TRUTH and Omar Khadr

The controversy surrounding Omar Khadr’s release on bail after many years in Guantanamo Bay, and the conservative Canadian government’s decision to appeal that bail without legal grounds for an appeal, has brought a powerful Cinema Politica film back into public discourse.

YOU DON'T LIKE THE TRUTH: 4 DAYS INSIDE GUANTANAMO (Luc Côté and Patricio Henriquez, 2010) takes an unflinching look at Khadr’s 4-day interrogation by CSIS from within the Guantanamo Bay military prison. The film merges expert and witness commentary with the official video recording of the interrogation, ultimately advocating that Khadr has been wrongly imprisoned and senselessly tortured by both the American government and the silently complicit Canadian government.

Five years after the release of the film, Khadr was granted bail by an Alberta judge who cited multiple psychiatric and penal system reports that Khadr has proven to be a “model prisoner” and has earned his release. Stephen Harper’s government immediately declared that it would appeal the judge’s decision on the basis that Khadr is too dangerous to release into the public, despite the fact that, under Canadian law, a judge’s decision can only be appealed if the judicial process – and not just the verdict – is allegedly compromised.

The decision to appeal so incensed Khadr’s lawyer, Edmonton-based Denis Edney, that he suggested in a CBC News interview that Canadians should watch YOU DON’T LIKE THE TRUTH (read a review of the film by CP's co-founder Ezra Winton here) to understand Khadr’s case before supporting Federal Public Safety Minister Steven Blaney’s baseless appeal. A subsequent CBC News interview with Roxanne James, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Public Safety, reveals the ignorant fear-mongering perpetuated by the Canadian government that Côté and Henriquez’s film seeks to counter.

Cinema Politica is proud to support this film and its demands for justice, and we encourage Harper’s government to respect its own laws by letting Omar Khadr re-join society as he deserves.